Homemade

By giving everyone the means of production, personal fabrication systems could usher in a new age of customization

13 min read
Illustration: Chris Lockwood
Illustration: Chris Lockwood

image of robots walkingIllustration: Chris Lockwood

“Fabbers—machines that rapidly create useful items on demand from computer-generated design specifications—have been fantasy fodder for decades. And for good reason: a machine that could make a huge variety of reasonably complicated objects, and yet was attainable by ordinary people, would transform human society to a degree that few creations ever have.

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Water Heaters Have Battery Potential

They’re more cost effective for energy storage than electrochemical batteries

3 min read
A water heater in a basement with a fusebox and blue tool box.
iStockphoto

This article is part of our exclusive IEEE Journal Watch series in partnership with IEEE Xplore.

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In this presentation we will build the case for component-based requirements management

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This is a sponsored article brought to you by 321 Gang.

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