Handcuffed: When the Government Wants Your Invention

A new U.S. court decision gives the government even more rights to use your invention

3 min read
Image: Stockphoto
Image: Stockphoto

In the patent arena, the U.S. Congress has set rules for the federal government that differ from those that apply to everyone else. When a patent is infringed for the benefit of the government, the patentee may have rights but cannot sue to stop the infringement. The government’s needs are deemed to override proprietary rights as a matter of public policy.

In the United States, this principle was established in 1918 by an act of Congress that allowed contractors to furnish the government with needed provisions during World War I without fear of becoming liable to patent owners for infringement. The Supreme Court noted this historical background in Richmond Screw Anchor Co. v. U.S. (1928). Today the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade permits governments to grant compulsory licenses under certain circumstances, and the United States and many other countries do so.

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AI Matches Doctors in Screening  for Tuberculosis

TB is the second-leading cause of death by an infectious disease, behind only COVID-19

4 min read
image of chest x-ray
Getty Images

A killer could be stopped cold—or at least be limited in its deadly toll—thanks to AI.

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Your weekly selection of awesome robot videos

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A photo of a human with two white robotic arms strapped to their arms

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your friends at IEEE Spectrum robotics. We also post a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months. Please send us your events for inclusion.

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ANA Avatar XPRIZE Finals: 4–5 November 2022, LOS ANGELES
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Get the Coursera Campus Skills Report 2022

Download the report to learn which job skills students need to build high-growth careers

1 min read

Get comprehensive insights into higher education skill trends based on data from 3.8M registered learners on Coursera, and learn clear steps you can take to ensure your institution's engineering curriculum is aligned with the needs of the current and future job market. Download the report now!