The August 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

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Yeah, so this right here is a giant robotic spider. By "giant" I mean that those legs are 20 centimeters long each, and if the body adds another 20 centimeters, we're looking at a robot arachnid that's a terrifying two feet across (0.6 meters). For what it's worth, this is approximately twice the size of the largest real spider, the Goliath bird-eater, and the Goliath bird-eater doesn't even jump.

Oh yes, this robot jumps.

The neat thing about spiders (if you're into spiders, anyway), is that they're hydraulically operated. Instead of moving their limbs with muscles, they do it by increasing the blood pressure in whatever limb they want to extend. Hydraulically operated robots work the same way, except they have a hydraulic pump instead of a heart and hydraulic fluid instead of blood. This can be a very effective way of providing power to limbs, which is why Boston Dynamics uses a hydraulic system in AlphaDog and PETMAN.

Anyway, back to this freaky thing. Designed by a team at the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation in Germany, this prototype robospider was 3D printed, meaning that more of them than I would personally be comfortable with can be manufactured quickly and cheaply. A hydraulic pump in the body provides fluid pressure to the limbs allowing the robot to crawl forwards and backwards, and some versions are apparently powerful enough to leap off the ground, grab you by the throat, and rip your head off. Or maybe not that last bit. Maybe.

In any case, having eight legs makes the robot exceptionally nimble, which is the whole reason for utilizing this design. The body of the spiderbot also contains the control system and a variety of sensors to enable it to perform its primary mission, which is as "an exploratory tool in environments that are too hazardous for humans." Like, I dunno, environments that are full of giant spiders?

[ Fraunhofer ] via [ Eureka

The Conversation (0)

How Robots Can Help Us Act and Feel Younger

Toyota’s Gill Pratt on enhancing independence in old age

10 min read
An illustration of a woman making a salad with robotic arms around her holding vegetables and other salad ingredients.
Dan Page
Blue

By 2050, the global population aged 65 or more will be nearly double what it is today. The number of people over the age of 80 will triple, approaching half a billion. Supporting an aging population is a worldwide concern, but this demographic shift is especially pronounced in Japan, where more than a third of Japanese will be 65 or older by midcentury.

Toyota Research Institute (TRI), which was established by Toyota Motor Corp. in 2015 to explore autonomous cars, robotics, and “human amplification technologies,” has also been focusing a significant portion of its research on ways to help older people maintain their health, happiness, and independence as long as possible. While an important goal in itself, improving self-sufficiency for the elderly also reduces the amount of support they need from society more broadly. And without technological help, sustaining this population in an effective and dignified manner will grow increasingly difficult—first in Japan, but globally soon after.

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