Freaky Robot Mouth Learns to Sing

Think this robot mouth looks kinda scary? Just wait until you hear it try to sing

1 min read
Freaky Robot Mouth Learns to Sing

Professor Hideyuki Sawada from Kagawa University in Japan was at Robotech 2011 showing off that incredibly bizarre robot mouth of his. It’s based as closely as possible on a human mouth, complete with an air pump for lungs, eight fake vocal cords, a silicon tongue, and even a nasal resonance cavity that opens and closes. Like other robot mouths, it uses a microphone to listen to itself speak (or whatever you want to call it) and analyze what it hears to try to figure out how to be more understandable and less, you know, borderline nightmarish.

I know, there wasn’t a demo in that vid. But I’ve got one right here for you, of this robot attempting to sing a Japanese children’s song called “Kagome Kagome.” You can hear what it’s supposed to sound like over on Wikipedia before or after you listen to the robot have a go, but either way, you’re not gonna recognize much. The action starts at about 30 seconds in:

Wonderful. Don’t get me wrong, on principle this is some undeniably fascinating stuff. I have to wonder, though, whether the effort it would take to get this thing into a humanoid robot would really pay off relative to a voice synthesis system based on software and speakers. I guess there might be other advantages to a bionic mouth, but I’ll leave the speculation up to you.

[ Kagawa University ] via [ Akihabara News ]

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Robot with threads near a fallen branch

RoMan, the Army Research Laboratory's robotic manipulator, considers the best way to grasp and move a tree branch at the Adelphi Laboratory Center, in Maryland.

Evan Ackerman
LightGreen

“I should probably not be standing this close," I think to myself, as the robot slowly approaches a large tree branch on the floor in front of me. It's not the size of the branch that makes me nervous—it's that the robot is operating autonomously, and that while I know what it's supposed to do, I'm not entirely sure what it will do. If everything works the way the roboticists at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in Adelphi, Md., expect, the robot will identify the branch, grasp it, and drag it out of the way. These folks know what they're doing, but I've spent enough time around robots that I take a small step backwards anyway.

This article is part of our special report on AI, “The Great AI Reckoning.”

The robot, named RoMan, for Robotic Manipulator, is about the size of a large lawn mower, with a tracked base that helps it handle most kinds of terrain. At the front, it has a squat torso equipped with cameras and depth sensors, as well as a pair of arms that were harvested from a prototype disaster-response robot originally developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for a DARPA robotics competition. RoMan's job today is roadway clearing, a multistep task that ARL wants the robot to complete as autonomously as possible. Instead of instructing the robot to grasp specific objects in specific ways and move them to specific places, the operators tell RoMan to "go clear a path." It's then up to the robot to make all the decisions necessary to achieve that objective.

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