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Freaky Robot Mouth Learns to Sing

Think this robot mouth looks kinda scary? Just wait until you hear it try to sing

1 min read
Freaky Robot Mouth Learns to Sing

Professor Hideyuki Sawada from Kagawa University in Japan was at Robotech 2011 showing off that incredibly bizarre robot mouth of his. It’s based as closely as possible on a human mouth, complete with an air pump for lungs, eight fake vocal cords, a silicon tongue, and even a nasal resonance cavity that opens and closes. Like other robot mouths, it uses a microphone to listen to itself speak (or whatever you want to call it) and analyze what it hears to try to figure out how to be more understandable and less, you know, borderline nightmarish.

I know, there wasn’t a demo in that vid. But I’ve got one right here for you, of this robot attempting to sing a Japanese children’s song called “Kagome Kagome.” You can hear what it’s supposed to sound like over on Wikipedia before or after you listen to the robot have a go, but either way, you’re not gonna recognize much. The action starts at about 30 seconds in:

Wonderful. Don’t get me wrong, on principle this is some undeniably fascinating stuff. I have to wonder, though, whether the effort it would take to get this thing into a humanoid robot would really pay off relative to a voice synthesis system based on software and speakers. I guess there might be other advantages to a bionic mouth, but I’ll leave the speculation up to you.

[ Kagawa University ] via [ Akihabara News ]

The Conversation (0)

How Robots Can Help Us Act and Feel Younger

Toyota’s Gill Pratt on enhancing independence in old age

10 min read
An illustration of a woman making a salad with robotic arms around her holding vegetables and other salad ingredients.
Dan Page
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By 2050, the global population aged 65 or more will be nearly double what it is today. The number of people over the age of 80 will triple, approaching half a billion. Supporting an aging population is a worldwide concern, but this demographic shift is especially pronounced in Japan, where more than a third of Japanese will be 65 or older by midcentury.

Toyota Research Institute (TRI), which was established by Toyota Motor Corp. in 2015 to explore autonomous cars, robotics, and “human amplification technologies,” has also been focusing a significant portion of its research on ways to help older people maintain their health, happiness, and independence as long as possible. While an important goal in itself, improving self-sufficiency for the elderly also reduces the amount of support they need from society more broadly. And without technological help, sustaining this population in an effective and dignified manner will grow increasingly difficult—first in Japan, but globally soon after.

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