Five Companies That Cater to Space Tourists

Blue Origin and SpaceX expect voyages to start next year

4 min read
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THE INSTITUTESoon enough other private citizens will join IEEE Fellow Greg Olsen, who back in 2005 became the world’s third space tourist. He blasted off in a Russian Soyuz rocket and spent eight days at the International Space Station.

Seats for private passengers are limited. The Russian rocket is the only spacecraft that carries astronauts since the United States retired its space shuttle program in 2011. Only six other space tourists in addition to Olsen have been able to afford the trip. He paid US $20 million.

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The Transistor of 2047: Expert Predictions

What will the device be like on its 100th anniversary?

4 min read
Six men and a woman smiling.

The luminaries who dared predict the future of the transistor for IEEE Spectrum include: [clockwise from left] Gabriel Loh, Sri Samavedam, Sayeef Salahuddin, Richard Schultz, Suman Datta, Tsu-Jae King Liu, and H.-S. Philip Wong.

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The 100th anniversary of the invention of the transistor will happen in 2047. What will transistors be like then? Will they even be the critical computing element they are today? IEEE Spectrum asked experts from around the world for their predictions.

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