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Find Out How You Can Get Involved in U.S. Engineers Week

Family Day, Girl Day, and other events will introduce kids to STEM

1 min read
Photo of a little girl happily playing with an air-pump rocket.
Photo: Jennifer Fong/IEEE

THE INSTITUTEThis year’s DiscoverE Engineers Week promises to “invent amazing,” bringing engineering to life for kids, educators, and parents throughout the United States. Running from 17 to 23 February, EWeek celebrates engineers and the way they change the world with museum exhibits, science competitions, and mentorship programs.

The festivities kick off on 16 February with Discover Engineering Family Day at the National Building Museum, in Washington, D.C. Now in its 27th year, Family Day introduces children to the joy and wonders of engineering with hands-on activities that are both educational and fun. IEEE-USA will be there, helping children build and launch rockets made from effervescent antacid tablets. The exercise pays homage to the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.

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The Transistor at 75

The past, present, and future of the modern world’s most important invention

1 min read
A photo of a birthday cake with 75 written on it.
Lisa Sheehan
LightGreen

Seventy-five years is a long time. It’s so long that most of us don’t remember a time before the transistor, and long enough for many engineers to have devoted entire careers to its use and development. In honor of this most important of technological achievements, this issue’s package of articles explores the transistor’s historical journey and potential future.

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