Engineers of the New Millennium: The Global Water Challenge

Dive into our special report on the Global Water Challenge

1 min read

Water is such a basic human need that it takes real ingenuity to find new ways to control, retrieve, and share this critical resource. We meet some of the wizards of water—the engineers who are helping communities handle acute water challenges and plan for the future. Listen to the individual segments, which are now airing on public radio stations across the United States, and check this page frequently to see if and when a show will air on a public radio station in your area.

Go to the Global Water Challenge special report.

The Conversation (0)

Q&A With Co-Creator of the 6502 Processor

Bill Mensch on the microprocessor that powered the Atari 2600 and Commodore 64

5 min read
Bill Mensch

Few people have seen their handiwork influence the world more than Bill Mensch. He helped create the legendary 8-bit 6502 microprocessor, launched in 1975, which was the heart of groundbreaking systems including the Atari 2600, Apple II, and Commodore 64. Mensch also created the VIA 65C22 input/output chip—noted for its rich features and which was crucial to the 6502's overall popularity—and the second-generation 65C816, a 16-bit processor that powered machines such as the Apple IIGS, and the Super Nintendo console.

Many of the 65x series of chips are still in production. The processors and their variants are used as microcontrollers in commercial products, and they remain popular among hobbyists who build home-brewed computers. The surge of interest in retrocomputing has led to folks once again swapping tips on how to write polished games using the 6502 assembly code, with new titles being released for the Atari, BBC Micro, and other machines.

Keep Reading ↓ Show less

Spot’s 3.0 Update Adds Increased Autonomy, New Door Tricks

Boston Dynamics' Spot can now handle push-bar doors and dynamically replan in complex environments

5 min read
Boston Dynamics

While Boston Dynamics' Atlas humanoid spends its time learning how to dance and do parkour, the company's Spot quadruped is quietly getting much better at doing useful, valuable tasks in commercial environments. Solving tasks like dynamic path planning and door manipulation in a way that's robust enough that someone can buy your robot and not regret it is, I would argue, just as difficult (if not more difficult) as getting a robot to do a backflip.

With a short blog post today, Boston Dynamics is announcing Spot Release 3.0, representing more than a year of software improvements over Release 2.0 that we covered back in May of 2020. The highlights of Release 3.0 include autonomous dynamic replanning, cloud integration, some clever camera tricks, and a new ability to handle push-bar doors, and earlier today, we spoke with Spot Chief Engineer at Boston Dynamics Zachary Jackowski to learn more about what Spot's been up to.

Keep Reading ↓ Show less

Safety in the Spotlight: Hendrix Covered Conductors

Safety-related contact currents for humans touching tedium voltage covered conductors

1 min read
Hendrix Aerial Cable Systems

This white paper explores what happens when humans come into physical contact with medium voltage covered conductors under a range of conditions. Safety thresholds, lab tests of charging currents, and CEATI testing of covered conductors are discussed. Authored by experts at Hendrix Aerial Cable Systems.

Trending Stories

The most-read stories on IEEE Spectrum right now