Electronic Treasures of the David Sarnoff Collection

Rare artifacts from the Golden Age of radio and television are featured in a new exhibition

1 min read
Electronic Treasures of the David Sarnoff Collection
Photo: Suzanne Kantak

Photo: Suzanne Kantak
256-bit magnetic core memory, circa 1952: Slow data retrieval and storage speeds limited the utility of early computers. RCA researcher Jan Rajchman’s solution was a memory array consisting of a wire matrix with doughnut-shaped magnetic cores at each intersection. By applying a current to a given set of horizontal and vertical wires, you could select a specific core and quickly change the direction of its magnetic field.

The history of the Radio Corporation of America is in many ways the history of 20th-century American innovation. From the company’s founding in 1919 to its sale in 1986, the RCA name was synonymous with products that shaped how Americans lived and worked. Long before the rise of Silicon Valley, RCA Laboratories, in Princeton, N.J., was at the center of the nation’s consumer electronics industry, harnessing the creative impulses of thousands of scientists, engineers, and technicians to systematize the invention of new technologies.

In October, a new exhibition highlighting RCA’s rich history opens at the College of New Jersey, in Ewing. It draws from the more than 6000 artifacts that the college inherited after the David Sarnoff Library—RCA’s main technical archive and museum—closed in 2009. (The IEEE Foundation funded a new study center connected to the exhibition.) The installation covers the development of radio, television, and broadcasting, as well as RCA’s work in liquid-crystal displays, electron microscopy, solid-state physics, and computers.

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How Nanotech Can Foil Counterfeiters

These tiny mechanical ID tags are unclonable, cheap, and invisible

10 min read
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Close up of a finger with a clear square on it.
University of Florida
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What's the largest criminal enterprise in the world? Narcotics? Gambling? Human trafficking?

Nope. The biggest racket is the production and trade of counterfeit goods, which is expected to exceed US $1 trillion next year. You've probably suffered from it more than once yourself, purchasing on Amazon or eBay what you thought was a brand-name item only to discover that it was an inferior-quality counterfeit.

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