Electronic Skin Made From Nanoparticles Offers Early Breast Cancer Detection

With greater sensitivity to irregularities in tissue, a new device could improve cancer survival rates by 94 percent

2 min read
Electronic Skin Made From Nanoparticles Offers Early Breast Cancer Detection
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Researchers at the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience at the University of Nebraska have developed a prototype electronic skin made from nanoparticles that they claim can offer an early detection method for breast cancer.

The researchers, who published their findings in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, developed a thin-film tactile device, also known as “electronic skin”, in which the contact pressure that corresponds to the shape of the object can be mapped by measuring the local deformation of the tactile-device film.

The research team built the tactile device layer-by-layer using spin coating of polymers in combination with the deposition of 10-nanometer (nm) gold nanoparticles, which are often used in cancer detection and treatment techniques—along with 3-nm cadmium sulfide nanoparticles. The overall multilayer structure consisted of three layers of gold nanoparticles and two layers of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles separated by nine layers of the polymers. All of this was then deposited onto a indium-tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate. The ITO served as the bottom electrode while aluminum foil was used as the top electrode.

In their tests, the researchers embedded objects that simulated lumps into a piece of silicone and pressed the device against it with the same pressure a clinician would use during a breast exam.

The results were significantly better than what a doctor might be able to detect. With the device, the researchers were able to detect an artificial lump as small as 5 millimeters wide that was embedded 20 mm into the silicone.

This compares favorably to clinical breast exams performed by medical professionals, in which they typically don’t find lumps as large as 21 mm wide. It's estimated that if doctors were able to detect irregularities when they’re half the size of those missed 21-mm lumps, a patient’s chances of survival would improve by more than 94 percent.

This test also offers some benefits over other detection techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which can be very expensive, and mammography, which is often inadequate for young women or women with dense breast tissue.

The researchers also note that it could be used to screen patients for early signs of melanoma and other cancers.

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Are You Ready for Workplace Brain Scanning?

Extracting and using brain data will make workers happier and more productive, backers say

11 min read
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A photo collage showing a man wearing a eeg headset while looking at a computer screen.
Nadia Radic
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Get ready: Neurotechnology is coming to the workplace. Neural sensors are now reliable and affordable enough to support commercial pilot projects that extract productivity-enhancing data from workers’ brains. These projects aren’t confined to specialized workplaces; they’re also happening in offices, factories, farms, and airports. The companies and people behind these neurotech devices are certain that they will improve our lives. But there are serious questions about whether work should be organized around certain functions of the brain, rather than the person as a whole.

To be clear, the kind of neurotech that’s currently available is nowhere close to reading minds. Sensors detect electrical activity across different areas of the brain, and the patterns in that activity can be broadly correlated with different feelings or physiological responses, such as stress, focus, or a reaction to external stimuli. These data can be exploited to make workers more efficient—and, proponents of the technology say, to make them happier. Two of the most interesting innovators in this field are the Israel-based startup InnerEye, which aims to give workers superhuman abilities, and Emotiv, a Silicon Valley neurotech company that’s bringing a brain-tracking wearable to office workers, including those working remotely.

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