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Electrical Stimulator to Prevent Migraines Receives FDA Approval

Zapping a cranial nerve for 20 minutes a day may help migraine sufferers

2 min read
Electrical Stimulator to Prevent Migraines Receives FDA Approval

Pharmaceuticals are so 20th century. Medicine's buzzy new trend is electroceuticals: ways to treat ailments with electricity rather than chemicals. Yesterday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new entry into this field, when it gave the nod to a device that prevents migraines by electrically stimulating nerves in the cranium. The device is manufactured by the Belgian company STX-Med, and is already approved for commercial sales in Europe, Canada, and Australia.  

Cefaly, a battery-powered device that resembles a tiara or a headband, can be used for daily 20-minute sessions. The FDA says this treatment may help migraine patients who can't tolerate or don't respond to medication.

The device works by stimulating the trigeminal nerve, the largest cranial nerve, which carries sensory information from the face to the brain, and which has also been associated with the pain of migraine headaches. According to the Cefaly website, its mechanism is based on the gate control theory of pain. By providing sensory input to the nerves, the device essentially keeps a neural gate closed to pain input. This theory explains why you rub your elbow after banging it—the sensory stimulus overrides the pain stimulus, which is transmitted to the brain on different nerve fibers. 

The FDA's approval is based on several studies conducted in Europe. One study of 67 migraine patients, published last month in Neurology, found that Cefaly users experienced significantly fewer migraines over the course of a month than patients who used a placebo device. However, in a user satisfaction survey, only 54 percent of patients who rented a trial device said they wanted to purchase the device. As those users who returned the Cefaly were shown to have used the device for only about half the recommended time, it seems possible that migraine patients are still more comfortable with popping a pill than wearing a tiara around the house.  

The product video provides more information, although there's a good bit of jargon to deal with. It may help to know that nociceptors are the receptors on neurons that respond to a pain stimulus. 

Image and video: Cefaly

The Conversation (1)
michelle Diesburg28 Jun, 2022
INDV

I can not find any information out there on electrical stimulation causing headaches. I use to see a chiropractor 10 years ago and they used one on me to help my back they said because it was a better method. It never helped my back and it started giving me bad headaches mid-session when they used it. I stopped going and the headaches disappeared. Today I had an electric nerve test which again caused a bad headache mid-test, I asked the technician conducting the test and he never heard of it. Why am I the only person getting bad headaches from these medical electric devices?

Are You Ready for Workplace Brain Scanning?

Extracting and using brain data will make workers happier and more productive, backers say

11 min read
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A photo collage showing a man wearing a eeg headset while looking at a computer screen.
Nadia Radic
DarkGray

Get ready: Neurotechnology is coming to the workplace. Neural sensors are now reliable and affordable enough to support commercial pilot projects that extract productivity-enhancing data from workers’ brains. These projects aren’t confined to specialized workplaces; they’re also happening in offices, factories, farms, and airports. The companies and people behind these neurotech devices are certain that they will improve our lives. But there are serious questions about whether work should be organized around certain functions of the brain, rather than the person as a whole.

To be clear, the kind of neurotech that’s currently available is nowhere close to reading minds. Sensors detect electrical activity across different areas of the brain, and the patterns in that activity can be broadly correlated with different feelings or physiological responses, such as stress, focus, or a reaction to external stimuli. These data can be exploited to make workers more efficient—and, proponents of the technology say, to make them happier. Two of the most interesting innovators in this field are the Israel-based startup InnerEye, which aims to give workers superhuman abilities, and Emotiv, a Silicon Valley neurotech company that’s bringing a brain-tracking wearable to office workers, including those working remotely.

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