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Economics Of The Singularity

Stuffed into skyscrapers by the billion, brainy bugbots will be the knowledge workers of the future

16 min read
Image by Bryan Christie Design
Image: Bryan Christie Design

This is part of IEEE Spectrum’s Special Report: The Singularity

Image: Bryan Christie DesignImage: Bryan Christie Design

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Colorful chip with wires coming out of it surrounded by large metal plates.

Engineers probe the performance of noisy bits that, when working together, may solve some problems better than quantum computers.

Lang Zeng/Beihang University

A large universal quantum computer is still an engineering dream, but machines designed to leverage quantum effects to solve specific classes of problems—such as D-wave’s computers—are alive and well. But an unlikely rival could challenge these specialized machines: computers built from purposely noisy parts.

This week at the IEEE International Electron Device Meeting (IEDM 2022), engineers unveiled several advances that bring a large-scale probabilistic computer closer to reality than ever before.

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