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Do You Have What It Takes to Become an IEEE Leader?

Volunteers are needed to serve as corporate officers and committee chairs in 2021

2 min read
Photo of a men and women standing wearing suits and work attire.
Photo: iStockphoto

THE INSTITUTE IEEE is governed by volunteer members and depends on them for many things including editing its publications, organizing conferences, coordinating regional and local activities, authoring standards and authorizing their publication, leading educational activities, and identifying individuals for IEEE recognitions and awards. Volunteer committee members also serve the mission of IEEE in humanitarian, industry outreach, public policy, governance oversight, and future planning.

The Nominations and Appointments Committee is responsible for developing recommendations to be sent to the Board of Directors and the IEEE Assembly on staffing many volunteer positions including candidates for president-elect and corporate officers. Accordingly, the N&A Committee is seeking nominees for the following positions.

2022 IEEE president-elect (who will serve as president in 2023)

2021 IEEE corporate officers

  • Vice president, Educational Activities
  • Vice president, Publication Services and Products
  • Secretary
  • Treasurer

2021 IEEE committees (chairs and members)

  • Awards Board
  • Election Oversight
  • Employee Benefits and Compensation
  • Ethics and Member Conduct
  • European Public Policy
  • Fellow
  • Global Public Policy
  • Governance
  • History
  • Humanitarian Activities
  • Industry Engagement
  • New Initiatives
  • Nominations and Appointments
  • Public Visibility
  • Tellers

DEADLINE FOR NOMINATIONS

The deadlines are 15 March for corporate officers and committee chairs, and 15 June for committee members.

WHO CAN NOMINATE?

Anyone may submit a nomination. Nominators need not be IEEE members, but nominees must meet certain qualifications. Self-nominations are encouraged. An IEEE organizational unit may submit recommendations endorsed by its governing body or the body’s designee.

A person may be nominated for more than one position. Nominators need not contact their nominees before submitting the form. The IEEE N&A Committee will contact all eligible nominees for the required documentation and for their interest and willingness to be considered for the position.

HOW TO NOMINATE

For information about the positions, including qualifications and estimates of the time required by each position during the term of office, check the Guidelines for Nominating Candidates. To nominate a person for a position, complete this form.

NOMINATING TIPS

Each year many ineligible candidates are nominated. Make sure to check eligibility requirements at the N&A Committee website before submitting a nomination.

The positions for which the N&A Committee makes recommendations represent the uppermost governance levels in IEEE. Volunteers with relevant prior experience in lower-level IEEE committees and units are recommended by the committee more often than volunteers without such experience. For example, candidates for the Awards Board have a greater likelihood of being recommended if they have already served on an awards committee of a society, section, or region or on another IEEE board.

Individuals recommended for president-elect and corporate officer positions are more likely to be recommended if they possess a strong track record of leadership and relevant accomplishments within and outside IEEE. Recommended candidates often have significant prior experience as members of IEEE boards and standing committees.

More information about the duties associated with the different positions, qualifications, and eligibility requisites (such as prior service in certain positions or IEEE grade) can be found in the Guidelines for Nominating Candidates.

James A. Jefferies is chair of the 2020 IEEE Nominations and Appointments Committee

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Economics Drives Ray-Gun Resurgence

Laser weapons, cheaper by the shot, should work well against drones and cruise missiles

4 min read
In an artist’s rendering, a truck is shown with five sets of wheels—two sets for the cab, the rest for the trailer—and a box on the top of the trailer, from which a red ray is projected on an angle, upward, ending in the silhouette of an airplane, which is being destroyed

Lockheed Martin's laser packs up to 300 kilowatts—enough to fry a drone or a plane.

Lockheed Martin

The technical challenge of missile defense has been compared with that of hitting a bullet with a bullet. Then there is the still tougher economic challenge of using an expensive interceptor to kill a cheaper target—like hitting a lead bullet with a golden one.

Maybe trouble and money could be saved by shooting down such targets with a laser. Once the system was designed, built, and paid for, the cost per shot would be low. Such considerations led planners at the Pentagon to seek a solution from Lockheed Martin, which has just delivered a 300-kilowatt laser to the U.S. Army. The new weapon combines the output of a large bundle of fiber lasers of varying frequencies to form a single beam of white light. This laser has been undergoing tests in the lab, and it should see its first field trials sometime in 2023. General Atomics, a military contractor in San Diego, is also developing a laser of this power for the Army based on what’s known as the distributed-gain design, which has a single aperture.

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