Divers Caught Cutting Internet Backbone Cable

Egyptian saboteurs damage cable, affect service across northern Africa and Asia

1 min read
Divers Caught Cutting Internet Backbone Cable

What’s the least sophisticated, but probably the most foolproof, way to cut off a country’s Internet traffic? Literally cutting it by severing undersea Internet cables. That’s what the Egyptian navy caught three scuba divers doing in the waters 750 meters off the port city of Alexandria on Wednesday. The cable they were going after was the 18 000-kilometer-long South East Asia–Middle East–Western Europe 4 (SEA-ME-WE 4) line, the Internet backbone that carries data between Europe, Africa, the Indian subcontinent, and Malaysia and Singapore in southeast Asia.

Internet service in Egypt had already been off since 22 March, supposedly because a passing ship damaged a separate cable. The trio, who approached “hacking” from a different angle than usual, took to the water a day before repairs to the other cable were expected to be completed and service restored.

The effects of the ship taking out that cable were experienced as far away as Pakistan and India, Jim Cowie, chief technology officer at Renesys, a network security firm, told the Associated Press. Cowie noted that a severed cable can force wide scale data rerouting, with some of the packets traveling the long way around the world.

Ship anchors and propellers have been blamed for serious cable breakages in the Mediterranean that affected northern Africa. Perhaps this incident will cause investigators to cast a more jaundiced eye in future cases.

Illustration: TeleGeography

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The Cellular Industry’s Clash Over the Movement to Remake Networks

The wireless industry is divided on Open RAN’s goal to make network components interoperable

13 min read
Photo: George Frey/AFP/Getty Images
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We've all been told that 5G wireless is going to deliver amazing capabilities and services. But it won't come cheap. When all is said and done, 5G will cost almost US $1 trillion to deploy over the next half decade. That enormous expense will be borne mostly by network operators, companies like AT&T, China Mobile, Deutsche Telekom, Vodafone, and dozens more around the world that provide cellular service to their customers. Facing such an immense cost, these operators asked a very reasonable question: How can we make this cheaper and more flexible?

Their answer: Make it possible to mix and match network components from different companies, with the goal of fostering more competition and driving down prices. At the same time, they sparked a schism within the industry over how wireless networks should be built. Their opponents—and sometimes begrudging partners—are the handful of telecom-equipment vendors capable of providing the hardware the network operators have been buying and deploying for years.

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