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Disney Working on Artistic Robot Swarms

Disney Research is developing control systems for swarms of little robots that can make patterns like a marching band

1 min read
Disney Working on Artistic Robot Swarms

disney robot swarm

I didn't know that Disney had a research arm, but they do, and the work that they're presenting at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) here in Shanghai might give a little peek into one of their future theme park attractions.

What Disney researchers, working with colleagues at ETH Zurich, want to do is develop algorithms that instruct swarms of robots on how to move into into different patterns using smooth and visually appealing transitions. It's kind of like a marching band, except with lots of little robots that light up in pretty colors:

While the algorithms haven't been specifically designed to make the transitions nice looking, a variety of different strategies were tested, and the prettiest one was chosen. Next, the researchers are going to try to toss some obstacles into the mix, and see how well the robots do with moving patterns, as opposed to static shapes.

This isn't the only interesting paper that Disney Research is presenting at ICRA. They're also working on developing a control system for a robot that can walk around on a ball:

Disney robot ball

As to whether or how any of this is going to make it into a Disney theme park near you, well, you'll just have to keep your fingers crossed and use your imagination.

The Disney and ETH researchers -- Javier Alonso-Mora, Andreas Breitenmoser, Martin Rufli, Roland Siegwart, and Paul Beardsley -- describe the work in a paper, "Multi-Robot System for Artistic Pattern Formation," presented yesterday at ICRA.

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How Robots Can Help Us Act and Feel Younger

Toyota’s Gill Pratt on enhancing independence in old age

10 min read
An illustration of a woman making a salad with robotic arms around her holding vegetables and other salad ingredients.
Dan Page
Blue

By 2050, the global population aged 65 or more will be nearly double what it is today. The number of people over the age of 80 will triple, approaching half a billion. Supporting an aging population is a worldwide concern, but this demographic shift is especially pronounced in Japan, where more than a third of Japanese will be 65 or older by midcentury.

Toyota Research Institute (TRI), which was established by Toyota Motor Corp. in 2015 to explore autonomous cars, robotics, and “human amplification technologies,” has also been focusing a significant portion of its research on ways to help older people maintain their health, happiness, and independence as long as possible. While an important goal in itself, improving self-sufficiency for the elderly also reduces the amount of support they need from society more broadly. And without technological help, sustaining this population in an effective and dignified manner will grow increasingly difficult—first in Japan, but globally soon after.

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