Countdown to the 2020 IEEE Annual Election

The ballot includes IEEE president-elect candidates, IEEE Technical Activities members-at-large, and IEEE-USA president-elect

1 min read
Photo of a clock that says "deadline."
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THE INSTITUTE On 1 May the IEEE Board of Directors is scheduled to announce the candidates to be placed on this year's ballot for the annual election of officers—which begins on 17 August. Those elected take office next year.

The ballot includes IEEE president-elect candidates, who are nominated by the Board, as well as nominees for delegate-elect/director-elect openings submitted by division and region nominating committees.

The ballot also includes nominees for IEEE Standards Association members-at-large, IEEE Technical Activities vice president-elect, and IEEE-USA president-elect.

IEEE members who want to run for an office but have not been nominated need to submit a petition to the IEEE Board of Directors. The petition must include the required number of valid voting members' signatures, and the petitioner must meet other requirements as well. Petitions should be sent to the IEEE Corporate Governance staff in Piscataway, N.J.

For more information about the offices up for election, the process of getting on the ballot, and election deadlines, visit the IEEE annual election Web page or write to elections@ieee.org.

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