Countdown to the 2022 IEEE Annual Election

Candidates to be placed on the ballot will be announced on 1 May

2 min read
Photo of a person holding a cellphone and the word “ELECTION” and a button that says “VOTE.”
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On 1 May the IEEE Board of Directors is scheduled to announce the candidates to be placed on this year’s ballot for the annual election of officers—which begins on 15 August.

The ballot includes IEEE president-elect candidates and other officer positions up for election, as well as a proposed amendment to the IEEE Constitution.

The Board of Directors has nominated Life Fellow Thomas Coughlin and Senior Members Kathleen Kramer and Maike Luiken as candidates for 2023 IEEE president-elect. IEEE Life Fellow Kazuhiro Kosuge is seeking nomination by petition for the position. Visit the IEEE elections page to learn about the candidates and petitioner, as well as the petition process and petition(s) available for members to sign.

The ballot includes nominees for delegate-elect/director-elect openings submitted by division and region nominating committees, IEEE Technical Activities vice president-elect, IEEE-USA president-elect, and IEEE Standards Association board of governors members-at-large.

Those elected take office next year.

IEEE members who want to run for an office but who have not been nominated need to submit their petition intention to the IEEE Board of Directors by 8 April. Petitions should be sent to the IEEE Corporate Governance staff: elections@ieee.org.

The Board of Directors voted at its November meeting to propose an amendment to the IEEE Constitution to be part of the 2022 IEEE annual election. The proposal, if adopted, would change the member-initiated constitutional amendment petition requirement by establishing greater member support for member-initiated petitions before ballot placement and enhancing membership’s global voice in proposing constitutional changes. Members are encouraged to participate in the online forum discussion.

To ensure voting eligibility, members are encouraged to review and update their contact information and communication preferences by 30 June.

Given ever-changing global conditions, members might wish to consider voting electronically instead of by mail.


For more information about the offices up for election, the process of getting on the ballot, and deadlines, visit the IEEE elections page or write to elections@ieee.org.
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