Cornell's Ranger Robot Breaks New Walking Record

Ranger, a four legged bi-pedal robot, set an unofficial record at Cornell for walking 23 kilometers untethered

3 min read
Cornell's Ranger Robot Breaks New Walking Record

cornell ranger robot

Ranger, a four legged bi-pedal robot, set an unofficial record at Cornell last month for walking 23 kilometers (14.3 miles), untethered, in 10 hours and 40 minutes. Walking at an average pace of 2.1 km/h (1.3 miles per hour), Ranger circled the indoor track at Cornell’s Barton Hall 108.5 times, taking 65,185  steps before it had to stop and recharge. Ranger walks much like a human, using gravity and momentum to help swing its legs forward, though its looks like a boom box on stilts. Its swinging gait is like a human on crutches since the robot has no knees, and its two exterior legs are connected at the top and its two interior legs are connected at the bottom.

Engineering students at Cornell’s Biorobotics and Locomotion Laboratory stayed up all night on Tuesday, July 6th, 2010 while their professor Andy Ruina cheered them on over Skype. Jason Cortell, a research engineer specializing in electronics and the lab’s manager, steered Ranger using a remote control. He walked for most of the 11 hours but was carted around when he felt tired, controlling the robot all the same. "When he had to take a bathroom break, he made a run for it while Ranger was on a straightaway," says Ruina.

This is a competitive milestone for the lab after (unofficially) competing for the record with Boston Dynamics’ BigDog over the past two years. The original record was set by Ruina’s lab in April 2008 when Ranger walked 9 km (5.6 miles) around Barton Hall. The record was subsequently broken by Boston Dynamics' BigDog when it walked 20.6 km (12.8 miles). "Ranger competing with BigDog is like Bambi meets Godzilla," says Ruina. "While DARPA funds Boston Dynamics with tens of millions of dollars a year, we've probably received a total funding of 1 million over many years." Most of Ruina’s lab's funding comes from the NSF's Robust Intelligence program.

"I don't anticipate bi-pedal robots being necessarily important in the world of engineering," says Ruina. "What fascinates me is the scientific aspect of bi-pedal robots. It's an indirect way to understand human beings. By studying the legs, joints, and length ratios we appreciate the beauty of nature's design."

But the overall task of the project isn't to reverse engineer a human being -- it is a study of electrical efficiency and their goal is to figure out how to build a robot that moves as efficiently as a human. "Human beings are robust and energy stingy," explains Ruina. "We are trying to get a robot to be as reliable as a human being. If Ranger walks 14 miles, he uses 3 cents of electricity, which is more than twice as much as a human of equal weight would have used for the same distance." The data could have an impact on biological research for rehabilitation, prosthetics for humans, and improving athletic performance.

What's up next for Ranger? The lab aims to have Ranger walk 30 to 80 km (about 20 to 50 miles), while continuing to cut back on energy consumption. Ruina also wants to see Ranger on an outdoor track with solar cells on top of its head. "Ranger would stop when it gets tired," he explains. "Then wait for the sun to charge him back up so he could go, go go!"

Here's a video report from IDG and more photos:

[youtube //www.youtube.com/v/YjTLSpFyi38&hl=en_US&fs=1 expand=1]

 Images: Biorobotics and Locomotion Laboratory/Cornell University

The Conversation (0)

How Robots Can Help Us Act and Feel Younger

Toyota’s Gill Pratt on enhancing independence in old age

10 min read
An illustration of a woman making a salad with robotic arms around her holding vegetables and other salad ingredients.
Dan Page
Blue

By 2050, the global population aged 65 or more will be nearly double what it is today. The number of people over the age of 80 will triple, approaching half a billion. Supporting an aging population is a worldwide concern, but this demographic shift is especially pronounced in Japan, where more than a third of Japanese will be 65 or older by midcentury.

Toyota Research Institute (TRI), which was established by Toyota Motor Corp. in 2015 to explore autonomous cars, robotics, and “human amplification technologies,” has also been focusing a significant portion of its research on ways to help older people maintain their health, happiness, and independence as long as possible. While an important goal in itself, improving self-sufficiency for the elderly also reduces the amount of support they need from society more broadly. And without technological help, sustaining this population in an effective and dignified manner will grow increasingly difficult—first in Japan, but globally soon after.

Keep Reading ↓Show less