Claude Gagnon: The All-Terrain Engineer

Getting Down and dirty on rugged, remote trails is part of the job for this designer of recreational vehicles

4 min read
photo of Claude Gagnon

Roughrider: Whenever he can, Claude Gagnon gets out of the office to test vehicles he helps design, like this DS650 sport ATV.

Photo: Bernard Brault

Whizzing along the muddy, leaf-strewn trail, Claude Gagnon holds firmly to his Traxter 500 as he accelerates this seriously powerful four-wheeler past logs and rocks. His fellow riders roar off close by in various other all-terrain vehicles, or ATVs, which are popular in this picturesque trail network just north of Montreal. It is nearly dusk on a crisp fall day when Gagnon and his colleagues reach the camp where they will spend the night, tired but looking forward to another day of rough-riding adventure.

A weekend of high adrenaline with friends? Not exactly. For Gagnon and the others, the fun was important, but that trip was work as well. The group was out in the woods of southeastern Canada to push some machines to the limit and evaluate their performance, from the ergonomics of their seats to their maneuverability across various terrains.

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The Women Behind ENIAC

A new book tells the story of how they broke a computer-science glass ceiling

6 min read
Two women programmers preparing a computer to be demonstrated.

Jean Jennings (left) and Frances Bilas, two of the ENIAC programmers, are preparing the computer for Demonstration Day in February 1946.

University Archives and Records Center/University of Pennsylvania

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4 min read
computer chip with chinese flag
iStock

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1 min read

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