Chinese EV Doubles Nissan Leaf's Range

Goes 320 kilometers on a single charge

2 min read
Chinese EV Doubles Nissan Leaf's Range
Earlier this week at the Detroit Auto Show, Chinese carmaker BYD took the wraps off a new incarnation of the e6 crossover it's shown twice before.
This time, however, it came with an upgraded interior, a more powerful drive motor, and a price: $35,000 before incentives. The company hopes to offer its 2012 BYD e6 S (for 'Sport') for sale in selected U.S. markets toward the end of this year.
$2,220 more than Leaf, twice the range
The price of $35,000, first reported on Plug-In Cars, is just $2,220 more than a 2011 Nissan Leaf compact hatchback, which retails for $32,780, and considerably less than the $41,000 Chevy Volt.
More significant, the BYD e6 S will have a range of roughly 200 miles--perhaps more--from its 60-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery pack. That's twice the Leaf's range, from a battery pack holding more than 2.5 times as much energy.
Twice as much power as in China
The BYD e6 is a five-seat crossover, rather in the same vein as the gasoline-engined Ford Edge. The e6 S model sold in the U.S. will be fitted with a far more powerful 160-kilowatt motor with more than twice the power of the home-market 75-kW motor.
BYD hopes to become the first Chinese carmaker to sell its vehicles in the challenging and competitive U.S. market. It has already placed a handful of test vehicles with the City of Los Angeles, sensible since it sited its U.S. headquarters in Los Angeles.
F3DM plug-in hybrid sedan too
BYD also plans to offer the F3DM plug-in hybrid in the U.S. next year as well. The car is an adaptation of the best-selling car in China, BYD's gasoline engined F3 sedan--more or less a cruder clone of a previous-generation Toyota Corolla.
While the F3DM was the first production plug-in hybrid sold anywhere in the world, starting in December 2008, its sales have been limited at best. It has been criticized by local press for crude transitions between power modes and marginal fit and finish.
 
This article, written by John Voelcker, originally appeared on GreenCarReports.com, a content partner of IEEE Spectrum.
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We Need More Than Just Electric Vehicles

To decarbonize road transport we need to complement EVs with bikes, rail, city planning, and alternative energy

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A worker works on the frame of a car on an assembly line.

China has more EVs than any other country—but it also gets most of its electricity from coal.

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Green

EVs have finally come of age. The total cost of purchasing and driving one—the cost of ownership—has fallen nearly to parity with a typical gasoline-fueled car. Scientists and engineers have extended the range of EVs by cramming ever more energy into their batteries, and vehicle-charging networks have expanded in many countries. In the United States, for example, there are more than 49,000 public charging stations, and it is now possible to drive an EV from New York to California using public charging networks.

With all this, consumers and policymakers alike are hopeful that society will soon greatly reduce its carbon emissions by replacing today’s cars with electric vehicles. Indeed, adopting electric vehicles will go a long way in helping to improve environmental outcomes. But EVs come with important weaknesses, and so people shouldn’t count on them alone to do the job, even for the transportation sector.

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