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Boston Dynamics' Bigger BigDog Robot Is Alive

The company that brought you the BigDog quadruped now has a bigger beast

2 min read
Boston Dynamics' Bigger BigDog Robot Is Alive

UPDATE 9/28 10:55 a.m.:  Looks like the embargo on the videos was broken. At least one person has posted videos on YouTube. We're including these vids below.
UPDATE 9/28 12:26 p.m.: Videos were removed. Sorry, folks, we'll have to wait for the official vids.
UPDATE 9/30 4:05 a.m.: Video of Boston Dynamics' new, bigger quadruped, called AlphaDog, is here. Vid of Petman still not available.

boston dynamics ls3 bulldog robot quadruped

Boston Dynamics, the company that brought the world the beloved BigDog quadruped robot, is now showing off its newest beast.

Think BigDog on steroids. The new robot is stronger, more agile, and bigger than BigDog. The official name is LS3 (Legged Squad Support System), but it seems that the Boston Dynamics guys are calling it BullDog instead.

Marc Raibert, the flower-patterned-shirt-wearing founder and president of Boston Dynamics, discussed the LS3 project in a keynote talk today at the IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems.

Boston Dynamics, based in Waltham, Mass., has made significant progress in transforming the DARPA-funded LS3 robotic mule project into reality.

boston dynamics ls3 quadruped robot bulldog

boston dynamics ls3 cad image

Like BigDog, the new robot is designed to assist soldiers in carrying heavy loads over rough terrain. But whereas the original BigDog could carry a payload of 340 pounds (about 150 kilograms) and had a range of 12 miles (20 kilometers), LS3 can carry 400 pounds (180 kilograms) and will have a range of 20 miles (about 30 kilometers).

It's also quieter, and the Boston Dynamics engineers are teaching it some new tricks: It will be able to jump over obstacles, right itself after a fall, and navigate with greater autonomy than its predecessor.

Raibert awed the audience with some amazing videos of the LS3 robot mule navigating rough terrain, trotting, and getting shoved (without losing its balance) not by one but two people at the same time! Alas, we can't show you the videos yet. Raibert told us that he's still getting permission from DARPA to make them public. So in a week or two we'll have them for you.

Raibert also talked about Boston Dynamics' humanoid project, called Petman. It's an adult-sized humanoid that the U.S. Army, which funds the project, will use to test chemical suits and other protective gear.

boston dynamics petman humanoid robot

Petman is another amazing Boston Dynamics creation. Raibert again stunned the audience with some really impressive videos of the humanoid walking, kneeling, squatting, and even doing push-ups!

This is the first time I see a machine performing movements like that. They look remarkably human, yet there's something uncanny valley-esque to them. No wonder Petman creeps out even Raibert himself. And you guessed it: The videos are embargoed as well; we hope to have them here soon.

By the way, if you like robot dogs, Boston Dynamics is hiring. Check out all robotics projects at the company in the slide below.

boston dynamics robotics projects

Images: Boston Dynamics

The Conversation (0)

The Bionic-Hand Arms Race

The prosthetics industry is too focused on high-tech limbs that are complicated, costly, and often impractical

12 min read
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A photograph of a young woman with brown eyes and neck length hair dyed rose gold sits at a white table. In one hand she holds a carbon fiber robotic arm and hand. Her other arm ends near her elbow. Her short sleeve shirt has a pattern on it of illustrated hands.

The author, Britt Young, holding her Ottobock bebionic bionic arm.

Gabriela Hasbun. Makeup: Maria Nguyen for MAC cosmetics; Hair: Joan Laqui for Living Proof
DarkGray

In Jules Verne’s 1865 novel From the Earth to the Moon, members of the fictitious Baltimore Gun Club, all disabled Civil War veterans, restlessly search for a new enemy to conquer. They had spent the war innovating new, deadlier weaponry. By the war’s end, with “not quite one arm between four persons, and exactly two legs between six,” these self-taught amputee-weaponsmiths decide to repurpose their skills toward a new projectile: a rocket ship.

The story of the Baltimore Gun Club propelling themselves to the moon is about the extraordinary masculine power of the veteran, who doesn’t simply “overcome” his disability; he derives power and ambition from it. Their “crutches, wooden legs, artificial arms, steel hooks, caoutchouc [rubber] jaws, silver craniums [and] platinum noses” don’t play leading roles in their personalities—they are merely tools on their bodies. These piecemeal men are unlikely crusaders of invention with an even more unlikely mission. And yet who better to design the next great leap in technology than men remade by technology themselves?

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