Blue Origin’s Next Rocket Engine Could Send the First Settlers to the Moon

In a cavernous building in Washington state, Blue Origin workers are constructing New Glenn’s BE-4 engine

8 min read
Blue Origin’s BE-4 engine performing a static firing at the company’s West Texas test facility.
Burn, Baby, Burn: Blue Origin’s BE-4 engine shows off its abilities during a static firing at the company’s West Texas test facility.
Photo: Blue Origin

Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon and the richest person on Earth, is of course a man who thinks big. But exactly how big is only now becoming clear.

“The solar system can support a trillion humans, and then we’d have 1,000 Mozarts, and 1,000 Einsteins,” he told a private aviation group at the Yale Club in New York City this past February. “Think how incredible and dynamic that civilization will be.” The pragmatic entrepreneur went on to say that “the first step [is] to build a low-cost, highly operable, reusable launch vehicle.” And that’s precisely what he is doing with his private aerospace firm, Blue Origin.

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Emmy Award Winner’s Algorithms Bring High-Quality Video to Your TV

He is working on making high-res images for the metaverse

5 min read
portrait of Alan Bovik
Alan Bovik

Alan Conrad Bovik’s passion for science fiction inspired him to pursue a career in engineering. His favorite sci-fi authors when he was young were Arthur C. Clarke, who penned 2001: A Space Odyssey, and Isaac Asimov, author of the Foundation series. Bovik says they wrote from a “very scientific point of view”—which made him want to help develop aerospace technology that would send humans “to other worlds.”

But he decided to study nuclear engineering in school—which then seemed like the future of energy. He discovered, however, that he didn't like the subject because it “required too much chemistry and memorization,” he says with a laugh. When he took a course in computer programming, he fell in love with it and ended up changing his major to computer engineering.

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Stretchable Artificial Nerves Help Restore Motion in Mice

New neuroprosthetic approach is more flexible and less power hungry than other designs

2 min read
illustration of a paralyzed mouse and a moving mouse

A paralyzed mouse with a spinal cord injury or motor-neuron disease [left] and a mouse that has recovered voluntary motor function by using stretchable artificial nerves [right].

Stanford University

Conventional neuroprosthetic devices that aim to help patients bypass nerve damage are often rigid and power hungry. Now scientists have developed stretchable artificial nerves that helped paralyzed mice run on a treadmill and kick a ball while consuming less than one-hundredth of the power of a typical microprocessor. The scientists suggest these artificial nerves may one day be used in the human body.

To help restore movement to patients who have suffered nerve damage from injuries or diseases, scientists are researching neuroprosthetic devices that can help relay signals from the brain to muscles or nerves. However, these systems often face a number of critical limitations, says study co–senior author Tae-Woo Lee, a materials scientist at Seoul National University.

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Take the Lead on Satellite Design Using Digital Engineering

Learn how to accelerate your satellite design process and reduce risk and costs with model-based engineering methods

1 min read
Keysight
Keysight

Win the race to design and deploy satellite technologies and systems. Learn how new digital engineering techniques can accelerate development and reduce your risk and costs. Download this free whitepaper now!

Our white paper covers:

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