Bits on the Big Screen

Computer servers and digital projectors are about to replace the canisters of film and spinning sprockets of the world’s movie theaters

14 min read
Bits on the Big Screen
Illustration: Clifford Alejandro

The annals of film history enshrine the movies that heralded breakthroughs in cinematic technology. There’s The Jazz Singer in 1927, which was the first feature with sound; Becky Sharp in 1935, which pioneered three-color Technicolor; and Glory Road, which…

Glory Road ?

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Golf Robot Learns To Putt Like A Pro

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4 min read
Golf Robot Learns To Putt Like A Pro

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