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FAST Labs’ Cutting-Edge R&D Gets Ideas to the Field Faster

BAE Systems’ FAST Labs engineers turn breakthrough innovations into real-life impact

1 min read
Woman uses her hands to operate control system next to man who observes other equipment.

FAST Labs is an R&D organization where research teams can invent and see their work come to life.

BAE Systems

This is a sponsored article brought to you by BAE Systems.

No one sets out to put together half a puzzle. Similarly, researchers and engineers in the defense industry want to see the whole picture – seeing their innovations make it into the hands of warfighters and commercial customers.

That desire is fueling growth at BAE Systems’ FAST Labs research and development (R&D) organization.


BAE Systems formed its FAST Labs R&D organization with the goal of cultivating innovation and creating disruptive technology. It is unique in the defense industry because it is an in-house, customer-focused R&D organization collaborating internally across the BAE Systems enterprise to develop and evolve technologies in advanced electronics, autonomy, cyber, electromagnetic warfare, sensors and processing, and more.

BAE Systems logo

FAST Labs: The heart of revolutionary research and development at BAE Systems

FAST Labs is an in-house, customer-focused R&D organization collaborating internally across the BAE Systems enterprise to develop and evolve technologies in advanced electronics, autonomy, cyber, electromagnetic warfare, sensors and processing, and more.

Explore careers at FAST Labs →

Today, the FAST Labs R&D organization is a place where research teams can invent and see their work come to life. While there are many examples we cannot publicly report, word has gotten out to the research and engineering community – especially those who have grown frustrated with the traditional defense R&D process or have been working on compartmentalized projects in the industry.

At FAST Labs, engineers get to turn their breakthrough technology innovations into real-life impact.

Want to see your research come to life? Learn more about innovation, the culture, and career opportunities at FAST Labs.

The Conversation (0)
Two men fix metal rods to a gold-foiled satellite component in a warehouse/clean room environment

Technicians at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems facilities in Redondo Beach, Calif., work on a mockup of the JWST spacecraft bus—home of the observatory’s power, flight, data, and communications systems.

NASA

For a deep dive into the engineering behind the James Webb Space Telescope, see our collection of posts here.

When the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) reveals its first images on 12 July, they will be the by-product of carefully crafted mirrors and scientific instruments. But all of its data-collecting prowess would be moot without the spacecraft’s communications subsystem.

The Webb’s comms aren’t flashy. Rather, the data and communication systems are designed to be incredibly, unquestionably dependable and reliable. And while some aspects of them are relatively new—it’s the first mission to use Ka-band frequencies for such high data rates so far from Earth, for example—above all else, JWST’s comms provide the foundation upon which JWST’s scientific endeavors sit.

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