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Bad News From Nokia: Another 3500 Layoffs

Nokia announces second massive round of job cuts in six months.

1 min read

Nokia has announced that it will slash 3500 jobs by the end of 2012. These pink slips will be in addition to the 7000 that the company announced just five months ago.

The recent phase “includes plans for reductions in manufacturing, the Location & Commerce business, and supporting functions,” according to a press release. Those plans include closure of a phone manufacturing facility in Romania, which will impact 2200 employees. The remaining 1300 job cuts will come from closing Location & Commerce development operations in Bonn, Germany and Malvern, PA. The company is also reviewing three other manufacturing facilities in Finland, Hungary and Mexico, which could spell more workforce cuts in early 2012.

The Finnish mobile phone giant announced 7000 layoffs in April when it ceased the development of its Symbian operating system—the most popular smartphone operating system until Android came along in 2010—and chose to use Microsoft’s Windows Phone operating system in its products. The company has completed the outsourcing of its Symbian software development and support activities to Accenture, which will involve the transfer of 2300 employees.

Nokia would not provide details on how many engineering jobs will be lost. But, hopefully, employees who are being let go will get the generous severance packages and job counseling that those laid off in April purportedly received.

PHOTO: Nokia

 

 

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