American Chemical Society Touts Nanobots as Nanotechnology's Big Impact

New video sponsored by the ACS makes nanobots the key to understanding nanotechnology's impact

1 min read

Folks at the Foresight Institute can take heart that at least the American Chemical Society (ACS) is promoting the idea that nanobots and nanoassemblers are how nanotechnology will have its big impact.

Or so it is presented on the ACS’ new website called Bytesize Science and this new video:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/v/xbcn7FR3pdg&hl=en&fs=1& expand=1]

The video is fascinating because it manages to move from nanobots and nanofactories to discussions of nanomaterials and buckyballs so seamlessly you would almost think there was no distinction between the two.

From what I gather this Bytesize Science is supposed to be targeting the future chemists of the world by making science fun. I am not sure that incomprehensible goop is really the way to do it, but I’ve never tried to teach children about nanotechnology.

The ACS has an august history with great scientists of history and today among its members. I would be surprised if some of them wouldn’t be a little surprised that the ACS(S) now stood for American Computer Simulation Society.

The Conversation (0)
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Emily Cooper
Green

Perhaps the most far-reaching technological achievement over the last 50 years has been the steady march toward ever smaller transistors, fitting them more tightly together, and reducing their power consumption. And yet, ever since the two of us started our careers at Intel more than 20 years ago, we’ve been hearing the alarms that the descent into the infinitesimal was about to end. Yet year after year, brilliant new innovations continue to propel the semiconductor industry further.

Along this journey, we engineers had to change the transistor’s architecture as we continued to scale down area and power consumption while boosting performance. The “planar” transistor designs that took us through the last half of the 20th century gave way to 3D fin-shaped devices by the first half of the 2010s. Now, these too have an end date in sight, with a new gate-all-around (GAA) structure rolling into production soon. But we have to look even further ahead because our ability to scale down even this new transistor architecture, which we call RibbonFET, has its limits.

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