Adaptive Toy Project Transforms Ride-on Cars and Interactive Stuffed Animals for Special Needs Kids

IEEE student members work with physical therapists to retrofit off-the-shelf toys

4 min read
ason Pavich [left], Chris Martin [center], and Garrett Baumann are three of the students at the University of North Florida who helped modify the ride-on cars as part of the school’s Adaptive Toy Project.
Photo: Jason Dearen/AP Photo

Video: University of  North Florida

THE INSTITUTEKids love driving battery-powered toy cars and playing with interactive stuffed toys that have buttons and switches, but some children have disabilities that make it difficult to engage in such play. The Adaptive Toy Project at the University of North Florida, in Jacksonville, is working to change that.

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The Transistor of 2047: Expert Predictions

What will the device be like on its 100th anniversary?

4 min read
Six men and a woman smiling.

The luminaries who dared predict the future of the transistor for IEEE Spectrum include: [clockwise from left] Gabriel Loh, Sri Samavedam, Sayeef Salahuddin, Richard Schultz, Suman Datta, Tsu-Jae King Liu, and H.-S. Philip Wong.

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The 100th anniversary of the invention of the transistor will happen in 2047. What will transistors be like then? Will they even be the critical computing element they are today? IEEE Spectrum asked experts from around the world for their predictions.

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