A Temporary Tattoo That Senses Through Your Skin

The Biostamp can replace today’s clunky biomedical sensors

14 min read
Photo of man holding circuit.
The Ultimate Wearable: John Rogers and his research team at the University of Illinois have developed a way of building circuits that act like skin, collect power wirelessly, and can be worn just about anywhere on the body.
Photo: Saverio Truglia

I turn the key to start the little Ford SUV I’ve rented for my visit to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a message flashes briefly on the dash: “Tire pressure low.” I ignore it. My own car is 12 years old; I’m not accustomed to a car that monitors its own health. Turns out, though, that the little Ford wasn’t kidding. The next morning I find the car has a flat tire.

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Water Heaters Have Battery Potential

They’re more cost effective for energy storage than electrochemical batteries

3 min read
A water heater in a basement with a fusebox and blue tool box.
iStockphoto

This article is part of our exclusive IEEE Journal Watch series in partnership with IEEE Xplore.

Water heaters are, according to new research, sizing up to be more than just water heaters in the modern, renewably-powered home. They could, in fact, be something closer to a battery.

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Portable Life-Support Device Provides Critical Care in Conflict and Disaster Zones

The compact unit is equipped with an innovative ventilator that recovers oxygen exhaled by the patient

5 min read
A soldier carrying a MOVES SLC portable life support unit walks over to an injured person on the ground.

Thornhill Medical's mobile life-support device, called MOVES SLC, has been used by military medical teams for five years. The unit can be slung across the shoulder and includes a circle-circuit ventilator and oxygen concentrator that eliminate the need to carry heavy, dangerous high pressure O2 cylinders.

Thornhill Medical

This is a sponsored article brought to you by LEMO.

A bomb explodes — medical devices set to action.

It is only in war that both sides of human ingenuity coexist so brutally. On the one side, it innovates to wound and kill, on the other it heals and saves lives. Side by side, but viscerally opposed.

Dr. Joe Fisher is devoted to the light side of human ingenuity, medicine. His research at Toronto’s University Health Network has made major breakthroughs in understanding the absorption and use of oxygen by the body. Then, based on the results, he developed new, highly efficient methods of delivering oxygen to patients.

In 2004, together with other physicians and engineers, he created a company to develop solutions based on his innovations. He named it after the Toronto neighborhood where he still lives — Thornhill Medical.

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