The December 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

Close bar

A Data Bus for Quantum Computers

Researchers propose a technique to transfer data between memory and processors in quantum computers

2 min read
Illustration on a red background of a white and blue computer screen with an atomic symbol glowing on it.
Illustration: iStockphoto

Quantum physicists are now laying the groundwork for a "quantum bus," which can teleport quantum information between the memory and processor components of future quantum computers.

Classical computers switch transistors between one state or another to symbolize data as ones and zeros. Quantum computers use quantum bits or qubits that, because of the surreal nature of quantum mechanics, can be in a state of superposition where they can essentially behave as both one and zero.

The superpositions that qubits adopt let them hold two states at once. If two qubits are quantum-mechanically linked, or entangled, they can hold four states simultaneously; three qubits, eight states; and so on. In theory, a quantum computer with 300 qubits could hold more states than there are atoms in the visible universe. Algorithms can use such entangled qubits to run an extraordinary amount of calculations in an instant.

Environmental disturbances and other noise can easily disrupt superpositions. As such, quantum computers need to carry out techniques known as error correction codes to protect them from interference. For instance, the information from a single "logical" qubit can spread to several highly entangled "physical" qubits to reduce the chances that any environmental disturbance will tamper with the information in question.

"Generally, the big challenge in quantum computation is that quantum objects are extremely fragile," says Hendrik Poulsen Nautrup, a quantum physicist at the University of Innsbruck in Austria. "Theoretically, we can use quantum error correction to protect those objects."

Just as classical computers have components that can serve as memory and processors, so too will future quantum computers need qubits that can either store data or perform operations. These quantum memory and quantum processor components will need to withstand different thresholds of noise—quantum memory must prove robust against change, while quantum processors must prove more flexible to change. As such, quantum memory and quantum processors require different error correction codes.

Previously, researchers have built small-scale quantum processors and quantum memory. However, given the different protocols used to encode information within these two different kinds of components, scientists now face the challenge of how to pass that information between them.

Now, Poulsen Nautrup and a team of researchers have designed a way to make such hybrid architectures viable. The scientists recently detailed their findings in the journal Nature Communications. "We can indeed envision a quantum computer with separate components that are used for different purposes like processing and memory," he says.

The new technique essentially involves modifying some of the physical qubits encoding each logical qubit. This strategy, which the researchers call subsystem lattice surgery, can temporarily "sew" different logical qubits together—for instance, those used in quantum memory or quantum processors. Once coupled, information can then be teleported from one system to the other.

"In principle, labs across the globe already have all the tools available to perform a proof-of-principle experiment," Poulsen Nautrup says. He and his colleagues are now collaborating with experimental physicist Rainer Blatt's group at the University of Innsbruck to perform their own. "I can't tell you too much about it because it is underway and has not been completed yet, but the intermediate results are sure exciting," he says.

The Conversation (0)

Why Functional Programming Should Be the Future of Software Development

It’s hard to learn, but your code will produce fewer nasty surprises

11 min read
Vertical
A plate of spaghetti made from code
Shira Inbar
DarkBlue1

You’d expectthe longest and most costly phase in the lifecycle of a software product to be the initial development of the system, when all those great features are first imagined and then created. In fact, the hardest part comes later, during the maintenance phase. That’s when programmers pay the price for the shortcuts they took during development.

So why did they take shortcuts? Maybe they didn’t realize that they were cutting any corners. Only when their code was deployed and exercised by a lot of users did its hidden flaws come to light. And maybe the developers were rushed. Time-to-market pressures would almost guarantee that their software will contain more bugs than it would otherwise.

Keep Reading ↓Show less
{"imageShortcodeIds":["31996907"]}