3-D Chips Grow Up

In 2012, 3-D chips will help extend Moore’s Law—and move beyond it

6 min read
3-D Chips Grow Up
Illustration: Paul Tebbott

The integrated circuit could use a lift. Almost 50 years after Gordon Moore forecast the path toward faster, cheaper chips, we’ve miniaturized electronic components so much that we’re increasingly colliding with fundamental physical limitations. The days of simple transistor scaling are long behind us—the latest, greatest chips are a hodgepodge of materials and design tweaks. These chips also leak a lot of power, and they contain transistors that are so variable in quality they’re difficult to run as intended.

Fortunately, chipmakers are pursuing a pair of innovations that will give dramatic boosts in the two categories that really count: performance and power consumption. In both cases, the trick will be to build up and into the third dimension. And manufacturers will do it at the level of both the individual transistor and the full microchip. In 2012, the chip will start to become the cube.

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New data-replay strategy prevents AI amnesia

3 min read
silhouette of head laying down with abstract colorful towers inside
iStock

Neural networks can achieve superhuman performance in many tasks, but these AI systems can suddenly and completely forget what they have learned if asked to absorb new memories. Now a new study reveals a novel way for neural networks to undergo sleep-like phases and help prevent such amnesia.

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7 min read
A collage of 9 photos of robots, including quadrupeds robots, wheeled robots, and drones.
IEEE Spectrum (Robots: Companies)

It’s been a couple of years, but the IEEE Spectrum Robot Gift Guide is back for 2022! We’ve got all kinds of new robots, and right now is an excellent time to buy one (or a dozen), since many of them are on sale this week. We’ve tried to focus on consumer robots that are actually available (or that you can at least order), but depending on when you’re reading this guide, the prices we have here may not be up to date, and we’re not taking shipping into account.

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1 min read

In this webinar, we explain the design principles and operation of our fourth-generation digitizers with a focus on the application programming interface (API).

Register now for this free webinar!

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