The October 2022 issue of IEEE Spectrum is here!

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Photo: Honda
Photo: Honda

This Year’s
Winning Autos

Trivia question: What was the first hybrid automobile delivered to the United States, back in 1999? If you answered, the Honda Insight, congratulations! The Insight beat Toyota’s Prius to market by a few months, but Honda’s hybrids have mostly languished in Toyota’s shadow ever since. The new Insight deserves to change that impression. It matches the Prius’s EPA rating of 4.5 liters/100 kilometers (52 miles per gallon) combined city/highway driving, and it triumphs in design, power, price, and performance.

The Insight’s hybrid system starts with a 1.5-liter, 80-kilowatt (107-horsepower) gasoline engine for which Honda claims an impressive 40.5 percent thermal efficiency. That engine is paired with the industry’s first permanent-magnet drive motors that contain no heavy rare-earth metals. A powerful motor drives the front axle and a secondary motor operates as a starter and generator. Combined, the two produce 113 kW (151 horses), 25 percent more than the Prius’s 90 kW (121 hp).

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Remembering LED Pioneer Nick Holonyak

He received the 2003 IEEE Medal of Honor

3 min read
close-up portrait of man wearing glasses and suspenders holding something between his fingers

Professor Nick Holonyak, Jr., inventor of the light-emitting diode, holds a part of a stoplight that utilizes brighter, current version LED's designed by students of his.

Ralf-Finn Hestoft/Getty Images

close-up portrait of man wearing glasses and suspenders holding something between his fingersNick Holonyak, Jr. holds a part of a stoplight that utilizes a newer LED designed by his students. Ralf-Finn Hestoft/Getty Images

Nick Holonyak Jr., a prolific inventor and longtime professor of electrical engineering and computing, died on 17 September at the age of 93. In 1962, while working as a consulting scientist at General Electric’s Advanced Semiconductor Laboratory, he invented the first practical visible-spectrum LED. It is now used in light bulbs and lasers.

Holonyak left GE in 1963 to become a professor of electrical and computer engineering and researcher at his alma mater, the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. He retired from the university in 2013.

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Video Friday: StickBot

Your weekly selection of awesome robot videos

2 min read
An image of a robot made of a small sticks tied together with a tangle of colorful wires, batteries, actuators, and electronics

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your friends at IEEE Spectrum robotics. We also post a weekly calendar of upcoming robotics events for the next few months. Please send us your events for inclusion.

IROS 2022: 23–27 October 2022, KYOTO, JAPAN
ANA Avatar XPRIZE Finals: 4–5 November 2022, LOS ANGELES
CoRL 2022: 14–18 December 2022, AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND

Enjoy today’s videos!

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Evolution of In-Vehicle Networks

Download this free poster to learn how developments in Advanced Driver-Assistance Systems (ADAS) are creating a new approach to In-Vehicle Network design

1 min read
Rohde & Schwarz

Developments in Advanced Driver-Assistance Systems (ADAS) are creating a new approach to In-Vehicle Network (IVN) architecture design. With today's vehicles containing at least a hundred ECUs, the current distributed network architecture has reached the limit of its capabilities. The automotive industry is now focusing on a domain or zonal controller architecture to simplify network design, reduce weight & cost and maximize performance.

Download this free poster now!

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