2015's Top Ten Tech Cars: BMW i8

Rich in carbon, not in carbon emissions

3 min read
2015's Top Ten Tech Cars: BMW i8
Photo: BMW

Video: Bloomberg Business

As a splashy billboard for a plug-in future, the BMW i8 is unmatched. Environmentalists who shake their fists at guzzling Lamborghinis fall in love. Speed freaks who scoffed at electrified sports cars change their tune in 4.4 seconds, the time it takes the i8 to howl to 100 kilometers per hour (62 miles per hour). Design mavens thrill to the BMW’s thermoplastic-clad, wind-cheating teardrop shape.

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Why EVs Aren't a Climate Change Panacea

Unless people change their behaviors, we won't hit 2050 net zero emissions targets

9 min read
Tesla Inc. vehicles in a parking lot after arriving at a port in Yokohama, Japan, on Thursday, Oct. 28, 2022.

Teslas in a parking lot after arriving at a port in Yokohama, Japan.

Toru Hanai/Bloomberg/Getty Images

“Electric cars will not save the climate. It is completely wrong,” Fatih Birol, Executive Director of the International Energy Agency (IEA), has stated.

If Birol were from Maine, he might have simply observed, “You can’t get there from here.”

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Bosch Powers the Automotive Sector Toward an Electrified Future

The German company has optimized three-phase inverters and their DC link capacitors with a simulation-powered design process

8 min read
Digital art showing a 3D transparent car with the electric engine connected to batteries.

The global transition toward electric cars is getting a boost from industry suppliers like Robert Bosch, which provides electrical components and systems to car manufacturers. The Bosch team optimizes three-phase inverters and their DC link capacitors with a simulation-powered design process, which enables them to identify potentially destructive "hot spots" early in the development cycle.

This sponsored article is brought to you by COMSOL.

Just as tourists in Paris are drawn to the Louvre, visitors to Stuttgart, Germany, also flock to museums displaying the great works of the city. Stuttgart may not boast of Degas or Monet, but its prominent names are perhaps even more famous than Paris’ painters: Mercedes–Benz and Porsche. Each of these iconic automakers maintains a museum in the southwestern German city they call home. Their gleaming galleries feature many historic and influential cars, almost all of them powered by petroleum-fueled internal combustion (IC) engines. Looking ahead, Stuttgart will likely continue to be the heart of the German auto industry, but how long will the IC engine remain the heart of the automobile?

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