Tag Results for risk communication (9)

  1. Bad Data into Computers Caused B-2 Crash

    The US Air Force reported that the February crash on take-off of the $1.4 billion B-2 stealth bomber called the Spirit of Kansas was caused by moisture interfering with the operations of 3 of the aircraft's 24 air pressure sensors. The sensors were all on the port side of the aircraft. The moisture problem was found to skew the data being fed into the aircraft's flight control computers. According to news reports, "The aircraft crew believed the bomber had reached the takeoff speed of 140 knots when in reality it was traveling ten …

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  2. Census: Going Back to Paper Due to "Lack of Communication"

    The U.S. Census Bureau announced yesterday that it was reverting back to paper from its plan of using handheld computers for the 2010 Decennial Census. The reason? According to Director of the Census Steve H. Murdock's testimony before the United States House Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice and Science, "the problem with the FDCA (Field Data Collection Automation) program was due to a lack of communication between the Census Bureau and the prime contractor for FDCA, and to difficulties the contractor had in developing the full scope of the …

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  3. Deja Vu All Over Again

    Last May, you may recall, TB patient Mr. Andrew Speaker flew back to the US from Europe over his doctorsâ'' objections, and was able to enter the US even though he was on a travelersâ'' watch list. To reduce the possibility of something like this happening again, US Custom and Border Protection officials said that they were putting new procedures in place. Well, last week it was disclosed that a Mexican national with multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis boarded 11 flights, at least one to the United States and crossed the US border a total of 76 times. Customs and Border Protection …

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  4. Be Realistic - Yeah, Right

    I was in Washington, D.C. yesterday attending a breakfast seminar sponsored by Government Executive magazine on the topic, "What Are the Essential Ingredients for a Successful Large IT Project?" The two gentlemen speaking were Randolph (Randy) Hite, Director, IT Architecture and Systems Issues, U.S. Government Accountability Office and Zal Azmi, Chief Information Officer, Federal Bureau of Investigation. It was an interesting session for a number of reasons. In this post, I'll concentrate on what Mr. Hite had to say. Hite was asked off the bat whether he thought that IT project management in the Federal …

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  5. Space Station's Computer Failure: It Was Inevitable

    James Oberg reports in an IEEE Spectrum webcast a very important story on the background to the NASA computer failure that occurred in June. Oberg stories states that, "The critical computer systems ... had been designed, built, and operated incorrectlyâ''and the failure was inevitable. Only being so relatively close to Earth, in range of resupply and support missions, saved the spacecraft from catastrophe." The problem was a cable short-circuit caused by moisture build-up, likely itself caused by a malfunctioning dehumidifier. But as Oberg writes, the short-circuit should not have caused the problems it did. "..in a shocking design …

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  6. Shooting the Messenger

    One of the first things one learns as a risk analyst is that you better develop a tough skin. No one wants to hear about potential problems, and some people, as today's story in the Wall Street Journal (subscription required) points out, can get down right nasty about it. In one example, the CEO of a software company got so angry about a a product continuing to slip its schedule, that he decided to make an example and fired the VP who told him about the latest slip. The CEO wanted to send a message, in other words: "I …

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  7. A Masterclass in Bad Decision-making

    The UK Public Accounts Committee (PAC) published its report regarding the The Delays in Administering the 2005 Single Payment Scheme in England. The delays are estimated to cost UK taxpayers some £500 million. As reported in the London Times, "the Single Farm Payment Scheme, introduced two years ago, aimed to pay farmers for their stewardship of the land rather than the number of animals they reared for meat." The Times went on to say that Edward Leigh, the Tory MP who chaired the review committee, said the farmers' payment project was â''a masterclass in bad decision-making, poor planning, …

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