Tag Results for game economics (8)

  1. Of course game sales are growing

    It's not a surprise to me that game sales are still good. Games give good value for money: a $50 console title that is considered too short is still providing probably 10 hours of entertainment at least. At $5/hour, it's break-even with a movie ticket (or slightly better, matinees near me are $11.50). And that's a bad game: good games provide dozens or hundreds of hours of entertainment. Combine that with an instinct to stay home rather than go out during the down economy, and it makes sense that games are still doing OK. Your entertainment dollar goes further with …

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  2. Game developer convergence

    Game companies have a hard life, no matter their size. Games are a hit-driven business, and it's hard to exist on merely "good" sales. The makes companies buy each other, or merge. EA bought BioWare/Pandemic, Activision and Vivendi merged, Rockstar just bought Mad Doc, and on and on. Companies want security in this fickle, unpredictable business.

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  3. Move over, EA, there's a new Big Dog

    The big news, broken on the weekend I assume to be digested for the market on Monday, is that Vivendi and Activision have merged, and will be known as Activision Blizzard, leveraging the two names in this transaction that mean anything good at all to gamers. Eighteen billion dollar deal. Are you ready for Guitar Hero: Eurovision Song Contest? Me neither.

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  4. The Death of PC Gaming

    Yeah, people have been predicting the death of PC gaming for a long time now. Pretty much since the arrival of the original XBox and Playstation 2, pundits have been saying that PC gaming is on its way out, that consoles are going to rule gaming from now on. It hasn't been true, PC gaming still thrives. Well, I'm joining the pundits. PC gaming is going away.

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  5. Apple and Games

    Here's one of several articles out about gaming on the Mac. With John Carmack at this year's WWDC keynote, showing off id Software's latest engine, id Tech 5, and Electronic Arts declaring a renewed love for Macs, people are singing hosannas about games coming to the Mac again. Nope. Not going to happen.

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  6. Are developers just thick, or something?

    In my previous post, I was talking about why games aren't "progressing" the way players imagine they would, why games seem to make only modest progress, when there's a clearly obvious "destination" that everyone can see. Why aren't we running full-tilt to that virtual universe, where everyone can do anything? The first reason is that, well, worlds are expensive: worlds have a lot of stuff, and people need to make that stuff. The next has to do with the technology available to create those worlds. Moore's Law is fine and all, because it means polygons get shinier and bumpier as …

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