Tag Results for game design (6)

  1. The Anti-Game?

    Eric-Jon Rössel Waugh has an excellent article on gamecareerguide.com on Animal Crossing, one of my favorite games. "Ambition and Compulsory Design in Animal Crossing" deals with games, goals, the motivations for play, and the platform context of a game. Well worth a read. He calls Animal Crossing "the anti-game": there is no punishment for inaction, there is no real conflict, there is no major obstacle to collecting the widgets that, in most games, require serious effort to earn. This game should make everyone question their definition of what a game is, and what is necessary for a compelling …

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  2. Are developers just thick, or something?

    In my previous post, I was talking about why games aren't "progressing" the way players imagine they would, why games seem to make only modest progress, when there's a clearly obvious "destination" that everyone can see. Why aren't we running full-tilt to that virtual universe, where everyone can do anything? The first reason is that, well, worlds are expensive: worlds have a lot of stuff, and people need to make that stuff. The next has to do with the technology available to create those worlds. Moore's Law is fine and all, because it means polygons get shinier and bumpier as …

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  3. Why don't game developers do what I want?

    The fervor behind the emergence of the first-person shooter ("FPS") game genre, began by Wolfenstein 3D and cemented by its successor, Doom, was in part because of the implicit promise: soon, I will be living in a virtual world. Heck, I'm already pretty much there, looking out through the eyes of a person as they have complete freedom of movement in a 3D world. Soon, I'll be in the cyberspace of Snow Crash. W00T. That was 1993. Yeah, fourteen years ago. What happened? Why has the most significant interaction innovation in the genre been "jumping"? Why are "cyber-cafes" depressingly non-virtual places, …

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