Tag Results for anthropomorphic (6)

  1. Rent an Actroid to love and marry

    A Japanese friend pointed me to an article on the history of the Actroid robot series. I don't speak Japanese, but the article features 9 video clips showing the robot's incredible progression since 2003. The clip below shows a video of the actroid Repliee Q1 from April 2007. The Actroid series is jointly developed by Japanese entertainment firm Kokoro and Hiroshi Ishiguro, well known for building a robot doppelgÿnger of himself. Kokoro offers the Actroids for rent to greet customers and provide information in up-market coffee shops, office complexes, and museums or "old houses". …

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  2. This is why we can't have nice robots: on the American consumer

    An article in PC magazine last week called "Robot Consumers, Grow Up!" explains why US consumers just aren't ready for the kinds of robots that Asia will be producing. The conclusion is that the consumer robotics market will not take off with things like Roomba or Aibo. Instead, robotic technology will be embedded into everything we use every day and the consumers will never notice that "the robots have won." I think the article is overall a little pessimistic, but here are a few interesting comparisons: Part of the problem is the Western world's relatively short history with robots. Most …

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  3. Team of siblings runs lucrative robot clothing business

    "If you don't dress up your Roomba, it's just a naked vacuum," quotes the website of MyRoomBud.com. MyRoomBud is a company run by a group of siblings that makes costumes for your Roomba and Scooba. I met two of the team at an MIT event two weeks ago and got the chance to ask Tyler, the CEO, some questions about their business. How old are you guys? How long have you been in business? myRoomBud is a company that my brother, Niles (13) and I (16) started about two and a half years …

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  4. How do you feel about your robot?

    It always seems to surprise inventors when robot owners find themselves unusually attached to their 'bots. Here's a quick roundup of links on the subject... Roombas fill an emotional vacuum for owners -- groan. The article talks about Roomba owners' relationships to their robots and how fond they become of them, a trend that "suggests there's a measure of public readiness to accept robots in the house" -- good news for any budding consumer roboticists out there. PackBot on the front lines -- I'm pretty sure I've mentioned this before, and it is an older aticle, but I was reminded …

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