Tag Results for Stern (5)

  1. Should We Discount Discounting in Climate Policy?

    Discounting of future costs and benefits is used ubiquitously in evaluation of both private investments and public projects. Though highly technical in practice, the technique would seem (at least a first glance) to be based in a simple, commonplace, and almost undeniable empirical observation. Given a choice between being handed a hundred dollars today and hundred dollars a year or two from now, wouldn't you rather just take the hundred right now? After all, even if you don't have any immediate use for the money, you can always invest it, so that after a year to two it will be …

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  2. Should We Discount Discounting in Climate Policy?

    Discounting of future costs and benefits is used ubiquitously in evaluation of both private investments and public projects. Though highly technical in practice, the technique would seem (at least a first glance) to be based in a simple, commonplace, and almost undeniable empirical observation. Given a choice between being handed a hundred dollars today and hundred dollars a year or two from now, wouldnâ''t you rather just take the hundred right now? After all, even if you donâ''t have any immediate use for the money, you can always invest it, so that after a year to two it will be …

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  3. IEA Energy Prognosis Confirms Stern Climate Review

    The International Energy Agency, the Paris organization that reports to the advanced industrial countries, has just issued the latest of its biennial Energy Technology Perspectives, saying the world's present course is not sustainable. If current trends continues, we'll be consuming 70 percent more oil and generating 130 percent greater carbon dioxide emissions in 2050 than we are now. To get emissions back to present-day levels or lower by 2050 will require a necessary but achievable revolution in global energy technology, IEA director Nobuo Tanaka said last week.

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  4. IEA Energy Prognosis Confirms Stern Climate Review

    The International Energy Agency, the Paris organization that reports to the advanced industrial countries, has just issued the latest of its biennial Energy Technology Perspectives, saying the worldâ''s present course is not sustainable. If current trends continues, weâ''ll be consuming 70 percent more oil and generating 130 percent greater carbon dioxide emissions in 2050 than we are now. To get emissions back to present-day levels or lower by 2050 will require a necessary but achievable revolution in global energy technology, IEA director Nobuo Tanaka said last week.

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