Tag Results for SUV (8)

  1. American Auto Upheaval Radically Changes GHG Outlook

    Jim Hansen, the GISS/Columbia University modeler who has had such a huge influence on climate policy, often observes that action plans habitually fail to keep pace with the latest developments, sometimes to their detriment. A case in point he mentioned a few years ago when I was interviewing him for a book: the near-elimination of CFCs pursuant to the Montreal Protocol had a positive implication for climate, because CFCs--besides being ozone eaters--also are potent greenhouse gases. A similar case in point from today's news--the precipitous drop in U.S. large car sales.

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  2. American Auto Upheaval Radically Changes GHG Outlook

    Jim Hansen, the GISS/Columbia University modeler who has had such a huge influence on climate policy, often observes that action plans habitually fail to keep pace with the latest developments, sometimes to their detriment. A case in point he mentioned a few years ago when I was interviewing him for a book: the near-elimination of CFCs pursuant to the Montreal Protocol had a positive implication for climate, because CFCsâ''besides being ozone eatersâ''also are potent greenhouse gases. A similar case in point from todayâ''s newsâ''the precipitous drop in U.S. large car sales.

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  3. April Figures Confirm Sharp Drop in Gas Guzzler Sales

    Data released yesterday, May 1, confirm earlier indications that sky-high gasoline prices are finally beginning to have a distinct impact on consumer behavior. Total U.S. auto sales in April were at their lowest level in 15 years, with sales of SUVs down drastically but subcompacts like Chevroletâ''s Malibu up 43 percent and Fordâ''s Focus up 32 percent. Sales of Toyotaâ''s hybrid, the Prius, climbed 54 percentâ''the biggest increase among the 15 most popular vehicles highlighted by The New York Times.

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  4. High Gasoline Prices Start to Bite into Driving, SUV Ownership

    With U.S. gasoline prices at an all-time high, having climbed in fits and starts for five years, the logical results appear to be finally showing up in lower gasoline consumption and a distaste for large cars and light trucks. According to a report in the May 5 issue of Business Week, the number of vehicles on the roads dropped 1.4 percent last year, and gasoline consumption is expected to dip 0.7 percent this year. Sales of SUVs and pickup trucks plummeted 27 percent in the first quarter of 2008, with total auto sales down 8 percent.

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