Hello, Apple? This is Flash calling.

Of course, I'm not calling you on an iPhone, I don't work with one of those. But oh, I want to. Get back to me about that, will you?

Yeah, the iPhone needs flash in the worst way. Why? Games, man, games. It's all about the games. Give me games on the iPhone. Imagine what you could do with that touch interface....

I'm a gadget freak, I admit it. I'll stand in line on Friday for an iPhone. But I already know that one thing I was sincerely hoping for is not there, which is Flash support in the web browser. Not only does that lock out most streaming video sites, but the huge potential for web games is gone.

I understand the closed philosophy: it's classic Apple, and entirely expected. I don't think security is the issue, it's simply that they don't want clutter ruining the sublime user experience that they have in mind. Sure, fine, whatever. But they've also said that they anticipate developers using web apps written for the iPhone to get around this limitation.

And I, for one, am fine with that. The apps I really want are already on the phone, and the ones I likely want less often would be well served by being web pages. If Google Documents works, that would be great, and I don't have to have Documents To Go or something similar installed. So it's all good, from my perspective.

But oh, that dual-touch screen just begs for web-based Flash games that take advantage of it. Aside from my favorite Flash games, like Deadtree, Tower Defense, Bowmaster Prelude, Deanimator, or anything at Orisinal, what sort of DS-like games could be done with a dual-trouch screen? What sort of Cooking Mama-ish, Trauma Center-ish, wildly addictive and innovative games would emerge with this brand new input device? I boggle to think that game developers are having to cool their heels on this one.

Come on, Apple and Adobe. There are legions of Flash game developers out there who would, I'm sure, love to be turned loose on The Phone.

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IEEE Spectrum’s gaming blog was retired in 2010, but it is preserved here for archival reference.

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