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DASH Roachbot Learns Acrobatic Flips from Real Cockroach


Uh, don't geckos eat cockroaches? Photo: Jean-Michel Mongeau, Ardian Jusufi, and Pauline Jennings (UC Berkeley PolyPEDAL Lab) 

DASH, UC Berkeley's 10-centimeter long, 16-gram Dynamic Autonomous Sprawled Hexapod, has learned a new trick: the robot can now perform "rapid inversion" maneuvers, dashing up to a ledge and then swinging itself around to end up underneath the ledge and upside-down. This replicates behaviors in cockroaches and geckos, and may lead to a new generation of acrobatically-inclined insectobots.

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Quadrotor Learns How Not To Swing Stuff

One of the ways in which robots are just starting to get really useful is with hauling aerial cargo. Last year, the optionally-manned KMAX made its first autonomous cargo delivery in Afghanistan, and since it can fly as many missions as you have fuel to keep it going, it's definitely a safer and more efficient way to get supplies to troops, especially in dangerous areas.

To move cargo around, helicopters (autonomous or otherwise) often carry stuff slung beneath them on long ropes, and as you can probably imagine, said cargo often ends up doing all sorts of swinging about, especially if the helicopter that's carrying it has to maneuver. Researchers from the University of New Mexico have been developing algorithms that allow robots to compensate for motion-induced swinging of suspended loads, and testing them out on real live quadrotors.

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Get Off the Couch and Exercise With Joggobot

Personally, I've never understood jogging. You dress in funny clothes, run in either a bunch of small circles or one big circle or in place on a treadmill until you exhaust yourself, and then end up back where you started all sweaty and gross. But, whatever. You can make nearly any activity 100 percent better by involving a robot, which is why this robotic jogging partner is such a good idea.

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Gibbot Training to Swing Like a Monkey

This purple little guy is the Gibbot, a robot designed by the Laboratory for Intelligent Mechanical Systems at Northwestern University to explore a particular type of locomotion that's been perfected by monkeys* to quickly and efficiently get around in trees.

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Quadrotors Turned Into Flying Wireless Battery Chargers

Cords are terrible, horrible things. Some of you may remember back to ancient times, when everything was corded and nobody was able to leave their houses. Ever. We've come a long way since then, what with wireless communication and batteries that don't totally suck, but really, batteries do still kind of almost totally suck.

Whenever you have anything that needs to survive away from the electrical grid for an extended period of time (whether it's a cellphone or a sensor), batteries are inevitably the limiting factor, and roboticists from the NIMBUS Lab at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln have solved the problem with a quadrotor that can fly around and wirelessly charge up electronics for you.

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Japanese MH-2 Shoulder Robot Wants To Be Your Friend, Literally

Nobody likes being alone, and Japanese researchers from Yamagata University are developing a robot to make sure you’ll never have to be alone again: the MH-2 wearable miniature humanoid lives on your shoulder and can be remotely inhabited by your friends from anywhere in the world. 

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Smart Pebble Robots Will Let You Duplicate Objects on the Fly

MIT Smart Pebble Robots

Imagine that you could toss an object such as a wrench into a container filled with tiny robots and, within seconds, the robots would "sense" the shape of the wrench and bind to each other to form a replica of the tool. Creating robots that could turn this sci-fi-like scenario into reality is the goal of an MIT team led by Professor Daniela Rus. They call the technology Smart Sand.

The project still has a long way to go. The robots the researchers have developed consist of relatively large cubes, each 12 millimeters on a side, but the team hopes to be able to shrink the modules in the future. In the mean time, the group is addressing another challenge: How to convey the shape of an object to lots of modules that have limited computational resources.

At this year's IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), in St Paul, Minn., Kyle Gilpin, one of the researchers, presented an algorithm capable of doing just that. He also showed video of a working prototype that, although it can duplicate only a very simple object, shows the potential of the technology.

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