New Next-Gen Nao Is Now the New Nao

We haven't even managed to save up for one of the original Naos, and now Aldebaran Robotics has come out with an entirely new, entirely more awesome version. Sigh. Yay.

So, what do you have to look forward to? We got a preview last year, but here's the skinny:

  • Nao is skinnier. Longer, thinner arms give Nao better reach and more working space in which to grasp things.
  • There's now a full-fledged Atom processor inside Nao. Helloooo multitasking!
  • Speaking of multitasking, two HD cameras provide parallel video streams, helping Nao get better at face and object recognition, especially in bad lighting.
  • "Nuance" voice recognition helps Nao pick key command words out of sentences.

But wait! There's more!

“On top of this new hardware version, we shall be delivering new software functionalities like smart torque control, a system to prevent limb/body collisions, an improved walking algorithm, and more. We have capitalised upon our experience and customer feedback in order to deliver the most suitable and efficient platform. In terms of applications especially at high-school level, we are focused on educational content, while, when it comes to improvements in personal well-being, we are working on developing specialized applications,” explains Bruno Maisonnier [founder of Aldebaran Robotics].

But wait! There's EVEN MORE! Pay special attention to the protective falling posture at 2:30:

Want one? Of course you do! It looks like you'll still have to go through the developer program to get one, though, and that'll run you about $5k, last time we checked. Oh well, with this new version out maybe they'll put all the old ones up for sale at 90 percent off or something. Please?

[ Aldebaran Robotics ]

[ Nao Next Gen ]

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